Meridian of the Month | Spleen

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Nancy Nelson

The meridian lines of the body are energetic highways that provide a path for Qi and other substances to flow. This year, we will learn details about one of the meridians each month as they coordinate with the time of year / season that we are currently in. For September, let’s discuss the Spleen pathway!

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The Journey of the Spleen Lines

The spleen meridian begins on the inside tip of the big toe. It then follows the inner aspect of the foot to the arch and then moves up just forward of the inner ankle. It then continues up through the inner leg and then veers onto the front of the thigh in the groin region.

It then enters the lower abdomen where it meets the conception vessel, then resurfaces briefly before moving into the spleen and stomach.

The primary channel then ascends through the diaphragm, over the chest and crosses the lung channel. It continues up to the esophagus and under the tongue. One of the branches moves qi from the stomach to the heart.

The Spleen Meridian | The Official of Distribution

The Spleen meridian enables the movement of Qi to the cells of the body as needed for optimal performance.

The Spleen is considered a digestive organ within the body. It takes the food and drink from the stomach and changes it into Gu Qi (food Qi), which then moves through the three burners and sent to the heart, lungs, and kidneys to support them with vitality and strength. The Spleen governs taste and nourishment. It also helps the body recognize foreign invaders by playing a large role in our lymphatic and immune systems. Other fun facts include:

  • Keeps tissues and muscles supported, toned, adaptable and moisturized.
  • Regulates bio-rhythms (like menstruation)
  • Believed to be the source of our postnatal energy (acquired Qi)
  • Stores Yi (consciousness of potentials) which helps the mind focus
  • In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the Spleen functionality includes the pancreas.
  • The Spleen sends memories to the Kidneys for short-term storage and later to the Heart for long-term.

Several specific physical symptoms that may point to an imbalance include: stomach problems, flatulence, vomiting, bloating, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s, dementia, diabetes, stress, muscle weakness, disordered eating patterns, nightmares.

The Spleen meridian is associated with the element Earth and is therefore very supported by warm meals, a calm and peaceful home environment, mindful eating, meditation and routine.

There are 21 points along this meridian line. Every meridian has a yin or yang counterpart or complimentary meridian. The Spleen lines are yin and the Stomach lines are the yang counterpart that also share the Earth element. The active season for the Spleen meridian is 5th Season (late summer) and the time of day the meridian is most active is between 9am – 11am. The color that represents this meridian is orange yellow.

IMBALANCEBALANCE (never 100%)
Lack of Confidence / WorryConfident
OverthinkingGood at problem Solving
Mental Overload / MultitaskingManages One Task at a Time / Monotasking
Struggle to ConcentrateFocuses Easily

Beyond yin yoga, balance your Spleen by eating foods like glutinous rice, red dates and chicken meat and drink herbs like American ginseng. Relax the mind and avoid over-thinking, maintain a positive outlook and include low-impact exercises.

Yin Postures for the Spleen Meridian
More Resources…

Blog Posts and More

Webinars

These one hour webinars focus on the meridians in a bit more detail if you want to learn more.

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Nancy Nelson
Nancy Nelson
Nancy is the fearless leader here at Nancy Nelson Yoga! She has been instructing yoga since 2012 and is certified as a Registered Yoga Teacher (E-RYT 500, YACEP) with Yoga Alliance. She loves guiding yoga classes in all forms – from sweaty vinyasa flows, to slow mindful movement - but her favorite style to practice and teach is yin yoga. She attended a formal 50-hour Yin Yoga training with Bernie Clark and Diana Batts in the fall of 2018 and it truly propelled her into developing her yin focused website, webinars and trainings.

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